About Humanities

About Humanities

By providing a range of interdisciplinary courses in comparative arts, the Humanities Program offers you the opportunity to explore, understand and appreciate the arts, and to evaluate their importance to life – especially how artists and their ideas evoke self-discovery and promote self-knowledge. Faculty member encourage classroom discussions which examine the value of arts in historical and contemporary contexts, explore the significance of the arts in urban settings, and reveal the unique way in which all of the arts express and embody meaning.

Emphasis is placed on discovering relationships among art, music, poetry, literature, history and philosophy from both topical/theoretical and historical perspectives. Leonardo da Vinci once stated that “knowledge has its origins in our perspectives.” With that in mind, we investigate the various ways in which experience underlies all of the arts and humanistic disciplines and seek answers to such essential questions as: What qualities are shared by all of the arts and humanities? What characteristics are unique to each?

Artists, musicians, thinkers and writers of a particular era are linked by bonds of chronology and context. But artists, musicians, thinkers and writers – from every place and from all eras – are also linked by a shared commitment to creativity. The study of Humanities addresses and investigates these several types of bonds.

In exploring such varying relationships, you will develop and enhance verbal, perceptual and intellectuals skills which well serve you well in whatever future career you may choose. Join us! Be rewarded by acquiring a fuller knowledge and a more broadly based appreciation of humanity’s most important thoughts and artifacts.

Humanities Spring Break in Paris is a fabulous opportunity to learn while you experience some of the most famous art, architecture, food, shopping, and history in the world.

Subject Area: Humanities

Level: Undergraduate Curriculum:
Humanities 3990, Directed Study (1-3 credits), is open to students by permission of the Humanities Program Director. All students will complete pre-departure orientation materials as well as a series of assignments and journal entries while in Paris. Students who register for two or three credits will select a topic, submit it for approval, and do research both before and during the trip. They will write a paper (length depends upon the number of credits) upon their return.

Regardless of the number of credits for which a student is enrolled, everyone participating in the Paris trip will visit all the sites on the group’s itinerary. Special arrangements can be made with the directors of the trip, for the purpose of visiting sites more relevant to topics for research papers.

Before the trip, you will complete orientation modules on Blackboard: You will take a brief Knowledge Survey, design a chronological chart that shows an overview of French history, write a short essay related to the chronological chart, fill out answers to two projects to be done at the Detroit Institute of Arts, and complete a checkup of architectural terms.
Depending upon how familiar you are with painting, sculpture, and architecture, the orientation modules should take a minimum of eight hours to complete. However, you should do one or two a week, in order to allow yourself to reflect upon and absorb the information.

As we leave Detroit, you will be given a journal to be filled in during the trip. Some of it will be as specific as following floor plans while you walk through a church; some of it will be as open-ended as describing what you personally observe about night life in Paris. Also you will be issued a single-use camera and a list of places (and types of places) to have yourself photographed while in Paris. Both will be turned in on the return flight.

If you are taking the course for two or three credits, you will hand in an outline and bibliograpy before the trip. You will work on your paper while we are in Paris, as well as after our return., Directed Study (1-3 credits), is open to students by permission of the Humanities Program Director. All students will complete pre-departure orientation materials as well as a series of assignments and journal entries while in Paris. Students who register for two or three credits will select a topic, submit it for approval, and do research both before and during the trip. They will write a paper (length depends upon the number of credits) upon their return.
Regardless of the number of credits for which a student is enrolled, everyone participating in the Paris trip will visit all the sites on the group’s itinerary. Special arrangements can be made with the directors of the trip, for the purpose of visiting sites more relevant to topics for research papers.

Cost:
$1950. Cost includes airfare, hotel, continental breakfast, museum entrances, travel insurance, guides, and administrative fees. Program fees may change due to unexpected increases in airline surcharges. If this occurs, those fees will be passed on to program participants.
Meet your class at the Detroit airport in the early evening. Board your transatlantic flight bound for the city of lights!

Friday, March 10
After checking into your hotel and grabbing a bite to eat, hop onto the Métro for a trip to “where
it all began” — the Gothic style of architecture, that is, at the dazzling Basilica of St. Denis, on the outskirts of Paris. Study the architecture, and view the tombs of centuries of kings of France (their final resting place until Revolutionaries dumped their bodies into nearby pits). After taking the Métro back to the hotel for a brief rest, the group will have dinner together at a nearby restaurant. Bon appétit!

Saturday, March 11
Begin this morning with a stunning view of Paris’ most famous structure, the Eiffel Tower, built for the 1889 World’s Fair. After taking pictures, board a bateau for a cruise down the Seine River. You’ll get a great overview of the city and catch a glimpse of almost all of Paris’ famous sites. You’ll make your way to the center of Paris for a tour of
the area, including the famed “Latin Quarter,” the Cathedral of Notre Dame and the Sainte Chapelle, by one of Paris’ best guides. From lunchtime on, the time is yours. You can climb the steps of Notre Dame for a gargoyle’s-eye view of Paris, visit numerous medieval churches and museums, or the cell in the prison where Marie Antoinette was held. You may do some shopping in the posh Ile St.Louis or in the trendy Latin Quarter. Visit Père Lachaise cemetery, the final resting places of authors, poets, artists, and musicians from Chopin to Jim Morrison. The possibilities are endless.

Sunday, March 12
Wake up early and join a group of classmates on a tour to Versailles, the hunting lodge-turned-palace by the Sun King, Louis XIV. Enjoy lavishly decorated rooms, exquisite gardens, and the little village built for Marie Antoinette so that she could escape palace life by pretending to be a milkmaid. Or, if you prefer, spend a leisurely morning at your hotel or attend mass at Notre Dame, and then visit Versailles in the afternoon.

Monday, March 13
This morning, visit the Louvre, a palace-turned-­museum that houses over 30,000 pieces of classical art from all over the world. After viewing the Louvre’s most famous piece, the Mona Lisa, and scores of other Renaissance treasures, you may find yourself face to face with Egyptian mummies or ancient Iraqi palace guards carved in stone. Your class will view some pieces together, and then you will have the rest of the day and evening to get lost in the Louvre, to visit the World War II Exhibit at Napoleon’s Tomb (required, but on your own time), and to escape to one of Paris’ many other attractions such as the Champs-Elysées, the Arc de Triomphe, or Les Invalides. Come face-to-face with hundreds of bones of Paris’ past nameless residents by visiting the Catacombs. Or, if you’d like a break from the norm, rent bikes in the Bois de Boulogne and bike through ancient forests and past picturesque lakes.

Tuesday, March 14
Today’s focus will be on Impressionist art. Begin the day strolling along the narrow, cobblestone streets of the Montmartre area. You’ll see many of the Impressionists’ houses and old haunts. Spend some time checking out the cheap souvenirs. After a quick visit to the Dali museum or a leisurely lunch in a ­local café, travel with the class to the Musée d’Orsay, which picks up where the Louvre leaves off. Enjoy the architecture of this fantastic museum, which was once a train station, along with treasures by Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas, van Gogh, Cézanne, Gaugin, and ­others. The rest of the day is yours to enjoy on your own, at the museum or elsewhere.

Wednesday, March 15
Begin the day viewing the sites in the Marais district, a swamp transformed into the most coveted residential area for 17th-century Parisian aristocrats. See Victor Hugo’s home, and enjoy a pastry (or two!) from one of the many local bakeries. Walk through time as you visit the Hotel Carnavalet, each room representing a different period in French History. Spend the early afternoon surrounded by Europe’s greatest collection of Modern art in the Pompidou Center. Finish the time together with a trip to La Défense, where you can view ultra-modern architecture. The rest of the afternoon is yours—you may choose to visit another museum, such as the Picasso Museum or the Rodin Museum, or work on your individual project.

Thursday, March 16
Today is yours. You may wish to join an optional excursion to Normandy to see World War II memorials,or the famous Bayeux Tapestry. You may want to take train to Auvers-sur-Oise to visit Van Gogh’s haunts, which were inspirations for some of his paintings, or you may simply choose to relax and work on your project.

Friday, March 17
Travel via train to Chartres, a picturesque French village overshadowed by Chartres Cathdral, arguably Europe’s best example of Gothic architecture. After an enlightening tour, have lunch in one of the local restaurants before catching your train back to Paris. The remainder of the day is yours to visit your favorite places one last time, and to say your goodbyes to one of the world’s most enchanting cities.

Saturday, March 18 After breakfast, travel to the airport and catch your flight back to Detroit.

Please note that you are required to pay tuition for 1-3 credit hours at your appropriate rate, payable through the normal tuition payment process. For more information, click here.

A non-refundable program deposit of $300 is required within 14 days of accepting admission into the program. Notifications will occur via U.S. postal mail and e-mail.

Priority Application Deadline: 5 p.m., December 5, 2005

Grants: Students are encouraged to apply for WSU’s Global Grant to offset some of their program expenses. Applications can be found here. Payment Information:The non-refundable deposit of $300 is due within 14 days of accepting admission into the program.

The remaining three payments of $550 are due November 28, January 4, and January 23.

The deposit and all payments are to be made out to Wayne State University. The deposit and all payments can be made by check, money order, Visa and MasterCard. Students wanting to pay program fees with either a Visa or MasterCard must print out the credit card authorization form and submit it to the office with the appropriate information.

Additionally, you are required to pay tuition for 1-3 credit hours at your appropriate rate which is payable through the normal tuition payment process.

Cancellation Policy: Participants who wish to cancel must do so in writing by mail or e-mail. Notifications should be sent

Participants are responsible for all program fees until notification is received by Study Abroad and Global Programs. Refunds are subject to the refund policy as listed below.

Refund Policy:
The $300 deposit is non-refundable. The Office of Study Abroad and Global Programs guarantees space on the program for participants upon receipt of the confirmation deposit. At that point, the Office of Study Abroad and Global Programs incurs non-recoverable costs. Therefore, any participant who cancels at any time after the confirmation deposit has been received will be responsible for the deposit in addition to the following, upon cancellation from the program:

Cancellation Period Refund

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